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Massachusetts Grade 4

Page history last edited by Robert W. Maloy 3 weeks, 1 day ago

Grade 4 Content Standards

 

Topic 1: North America Geography and Map Skills

 

  • Supporting Question:  What are the physical features and nations of North America? 

 

1. On a physical map of North America, locate and identify important physical features.

 

2. On a political map of North America, locate Canada and its provinces, Mexico and its states, the nations of the Caribbean, and the United States and its states; explain the difference between a continent, a country, a state or province, and a city.

 

3. Research and convey information about Canada or Mexico

 

 

 

Topic 2:  Ancient Civilizations of North America

 

  • Supporting Question:  How do archaeologists develop theories about ancient migrations?

 

1. Evaluate competing theories about the origins of people in North America and evidence for dating the existence of early populations in North America to about 15,000 years ago.

 

 

2. Using maps of historic Native People's culture regions of North America and photographs, identify archaeological evidence of some of the characteristics of major civilizations of this period.

 

 

 

 

3. Explain how archaeologists conduct research (e.g., by participating in excavations, studying artifacts and organic remains, climate and astronomical data, and collaborating with other scholars) to develop theories about migration, settlement patterns, and cultures in prehistoric periods.

 

4. Give examples of archaeological sites in North America that are preserved as national or state monuments, parks, or international heritage sites and explain their importance in presenting a comprehensive history of Americans.

 

 

 

 

Topic 3:  Early European Exploration and Conquest

 

  • Supporting Question:  What were the reasons for European voyages across the Atlantic Ocean? 

 

1. Explain how historians studying the European voyages to the Americas use archaeological evidence, maps, illustrations, and texts produced in Europe at the time, and all of these materials are called primary sources.

 

2. Explain who the Vikings were and describe evidence of their early exploration of the North American Atlantic coast.

 

 

3. Trace on a map European explorations of North America and the Caribbean Islands in the 15th and 16th centuries.

 

 

 

 

Topic 4:  The Expansion of the United States Over Time and Its Regions Today

 

  • Supporting Question:  How has the environment shaped the development of each region? 

 

1. Describe how the construction of canals, roads, and railways in the 19th century helped the United States to expand westward.

 

 

 

2. Give examples of some of the ways the United States acquired new states (beyond the original 13 states) and additional territories between 1791 and 1898.

 

 

 

      • Treaty with Britain to gain the Oregon Territory in the Northwest

 

 

 

 

 

3. Compare different reasons why men and women who lived in the Eastern part of the United States wanted to move West in the 19th century, and describe aspects of pioneer life on the frontier (e.g., wagon train journey on the Oregon and Santa Fe Trails and settlements in the western territories).

 

 

 

 

4. Explain that many different groups of people immigrated to the United States from other places voluntarily and some were brought to the United States against their will (as in the case of African slaves).

 

 

 

5. Show an understanding that in the middle of the 19th century, the people of the United States were deeply divided over the question of slavery and its expansion into newly settled parts of the West, which led to the Civil War from 1861 to 1865.

 

 

 

Census Regions and Divisions of the United States

 

Northeast

1. On a political map of the United States, locate the states in the Northeast.

 

2. Construct a map of the Northeast that shows important cities, state capitals, major rivers, lakes and mountain ranges.

 

3. Explain the benefits in the 18th century of becoming a state in the United States (as opposed to a British colony) and construct a timeline that shows when each of the states in the region was admitted into the United States (New Hampshire, 1788; Vermont, 1791; New York, 1788; Massachusetts, 1788; Maine, 1820; Connecticut, 1788; Rhode Island, 1790; Pennsylvania, 1787; and New Jersey, 1787).

 

4. Develop questions, conduct research and analyze how people have adapted to the environment of the Northeast, and how physical features and natural resources affected settlement patterns, the growth of major urban/suburban areas, industries or trade.

 

5. Describe the diverse cultural nature of the region, including contributions of Native Peoples, African Americans, Europeans and various immigrant groups over time.

 

Southeast

1. On a political map of the United States, locate the states and the national capital city in the Southeast and the U.S. territories in the Caribbean, and add the states and admission dates for the states in the Southeast.

 

2. Describe the diverse cultural nature of the region, including contributions of Native Peoples, African Americans, Europeans and various immigrant groups.

 

3. Explain how natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods have affected the region and how government and citizens have responded to catastrophic natural events.

 

4. Describe the role of Washington, D.C. as the national capital and give examples of its national cultural and civic resources.

 

 

 

5. Construct a map of the Southeast that provides information about physical features such as waterways and mountains.

 

 

 

The Midwest

1. On a political map of the United States, locate the states in the Midwest and add the states and admission dates for the states in the Midwest.

 

2. Describe the diverse cultural nature of the region, including contributions of Native Peoples, African Americans, Europeans and immigrant groups from other regions of the world.

 

 

3. Explain how natural disasters, such as tornadoes and drought, have affected the region and how government and citizens have responded to catastrophic natural events.

 

4. Construct a map of the Midwest that provides information about physical features, natural resources and industries such as agriculture.

 

 

The Southwest

1. On a political map of the United States, locate the states in the Southwest and add to the timeline the admission dates for states in the Southwest.

 

2. Explain that Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico were territories that formerly belonged to Mexico; that Texas declared independence from Mexico in 1836, and that Arizona and New Mexico were taken by the United States as a result of the Mexican-American War, 1846-1848.

 

 

3. Describe the diverse cultural nature of the region, including contributions of Native Peoples, African Americans, Europeans and immigrant groups from other regions of the world settling in the region over time.

 

4. Explain how natural disasters, such as hurricanes and drought, have affected the region and how government and citizens have responded to catastrophic natural events.

 

 

 

5. Construct a map of the Southwest that provides information about physical features, climate, settlements and movements of Native peoples, European exploration and pioneer settlements of the 17th to 19th centuries.

 

 

The West

1. On a political map of the United States, locate the states in the West and add to the timeline the admission dates for states.

 

2. Explain that California, Colorado, and Utah were territories that belonged to Mexico and were taken by the United States as a result of the Mexican-American War, 1846-1848.

 

 

3. Describe the diverse cultural nature of the region, including contributions of Native Peoples, African Americans, Europeans and immigrant groups from other regions of the world over time.

 

4. Explain how natural disasters, such as drought and forest fires, have affected the region and how government and citizens have responded to catastrophic events.

 

5. Construct a map of a states in the West region that provides information about important landmarks, national parks, and historic sites.

 

 

 

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